7 Techniques for Mastering the Upsell & Boosting Customer Buy-In

Source: https://www.autogrow.co/7-techniques-for-upselling/

Have you ever played Starcraft? And what about Civilization? Or any other computer strategy game for that matter? 

In these kinds of games, you basically control the growth and evolution of a society. 

In order to grow, you need to mine and collect resources. Lumber, ore, food, stones—you know, the building blocks of any great civilization. 

And like so many other games, the end goal is usually to dominate the other societies on the map. 

Now, a lot of people make the mistake of focusing all their efforts on boosting military power first thing. But the truth is, upgrading your ability to mine resources better is the key to success. Because when you focus on that, you can get more lumber out of a tree. More stone out of a quarry. And more ore out of a mine. 

You’re getting more value out of the same resource

And that lets you grow, advance, and thrive faster than the other societies you’re competing with. 

Upselling is like upgrading your business’ ability to mine value from your customers. It lets you earn higher revenue per client. And that means you don’t have to spend nearly as much time on finding new clients… when you do it right

In this article you will learn how to master the art of upselling, why they work, and how they help you get more value from fewer customers.

So let’s start skyrocketing your customer value with upselling right now!

What is an Upsell?

Before getting into how upselling can help you boost your business, let’s make sure we understand what an upsell is. 

Here’s a quick definition we go by here at AutoGrow: 

An upsell is a technique where you entice a customer to buy more. You can do this by providing upgrades, expensive items, or other add-ons to their purchase to increase the dollar amount of the entire purchase.

Simply put, an upsell is just a way to increase the value of each customer. It accomplishes that goal by getting a customer to buy other products or upgrade to higher value ones that you offer. 

There are two main ways of incorporating upselling into your business. 

1. Increase the Average Order Value (AOV) by getting clients to buy other products or upgrading before checking out. 

2. Increase the Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) by getting clients to buy other products or upgrading after checking out (this is where a solid email nurturing campaign comes in).

Why Do I Need to Start Upselling? 

Simple… 

It makes you money. Why else do you do anything in a business? 

Upselling increases the value of a customer. Whether it’s by boosting their initial purchase value or by increasing the lifetime value, the end result is still the same: your customers will be worth more. 

But what makes upselling different is the fact that it’s often an especially simple and cost-effective way of increasing the value of a customer. 

For example, we’ve all heard the old saying that it’s more costly to get new customers than to retain old ones. But do you know just how huge the difference is? 

Some estimates put it at being 5X more expensive to find new customers compared to selling to older ones. 

In fact, boosting customer retention rates by just 5% has been shown to lead to profit increases of 25% or more! That’s because returning customers have a higher CLV. They’re easier to sell to, often have a higher AOV when they do buy from you, and they are a great source for referrals too. 

Okay, so increasing retention is great for business. But what a lot of businesses don’t take into account is that boosting monetization of current customers also comes with a huge ROI boost

We covered this in another post about upselling but it’s worth repeating here. 

In a study of 512 different companies, Price Intelligently, a pricing strategy company, found that increasing monetization of current customers is the fastest route to boosting profits. 

As you can see from the graph below, improving the AOV (monetization) of customers by just 1% can lead to a 12.7% increase in profits

Retention came in second with a 6.71% profit boost per 1% improvement and acquisition was dead last with just a 3.32% increase. 

Source: Price Intelligently

The main takeaway here is clear: increasing the AOV and CLV of customers is more important than bringing in new ones. 

And upselling is the best and easiest way to do both.

Upselling vs. Cross-Selling

There’s usually quite a bit of confusion surrounding this question. And in fact, a lot of the time people just use the two terms interchangeably. I’m guilty of it myself. 

Now, in most cases using the wrong term here won’t be the difference between life or death. 

But when you get down to the nitty-gritty of it all, there are some distinct differences between the two. So let’s take a look at just what those differences are. 

  • Upselling: This is technically when a business or service offers an upgrade to a product that a customer has picked out. Take AutoGrow for example. Our instant Done-For-You funnel marketing team’s Ultimate Package is our most popular. But we also know some clients will get more value out of the Supreme Package. So we send out an upsell email describing the benefits of switching to the Supreme Package so our clients understand if it’s a good fit for their business. That’s an upsell
  • Cross-Selling: This is when you offer a different product or service to a customer after they’ve already chosen what they’re buying from you. Amazon does a great job at this. There’s an entire section of every product page that shows you what other products are frequently bought together with the one you’re looking at. If I look at a baseball glove, for example, it also shows me baseballs and glove oil, right on the same page! There are even a few buttons right there so you can add them to your cart with just one click. That’s cross-selling. 

There are plenty of other examples of upsells and cross-sells out there today, especially as e-commerce becomes the main way we shop today. 

And honestly, distinguishing between the two isn’t as important as understanding what both accomplish, which is increasing the value of a customer. 

3 Reasons Why Upselling/Cross-Selling Works

Upselling and cross-selling are two of the best ways to boost monetization and retention of customers. And as we’ve seen, focusing on these two areas in particular can increase profitability by 3-4X more than concentrating on customer acquisition. 

But why do these tactics work? Why do people respond to them? And what is it about these techniques that make them irresistible when done right? 

There are 3 reasons here…

  • Emotional Excitement: First and foremost, there’s the thrill of buying! Okay, so emotions may not be running too high when you’re purchasing a new loofa or a pack of undershirts. But there are two things in particular that bring out our emotional side when buying: the promise of a better you (smarter, sexier, funnier, happier, whatever!) and cashing in on an exceptional deal (high value for low cost). Upselling taps into those emotions from the original product and makes them even stronger. They’re taking what makes you feel good about buying and giving it a boost along the way. 
  • Already Spending Money: The hardest part about spending money is… well, first deciding to spend money. There’s the guilt, the uncertainty, the skepticism—it all adds up to you asking yourself, “Is this really worth it?” But when you’ve already barrelled past those obstacles once, it makes it so much easier to keep on doing it. Once you’ve actually decided to spend money on a purchase, you’ve broken down the floodgates. And making an additional purchase (as long as it has value) is going to be easier than deciding to make the first. 
  • Trust Is Built: Finally, once you’ve built up trust with a customer, it’s far easier to sell to them again and again. One of the most commonly pointed to stats here is from Marketing Metrics. It says, “The probability of selling to a new prospect is 5%-20%. The probability of selling to an existing customer is 60-70%.” That’s because you’ve already shown past customers that you deliver value. And once you’ve done that, you become a trusted source of quality products or services. All that’s left now is maintaining that trust.

7 Things to ALWAYS (and NEVER) Do When Upselling

So, now that we know what upselling is, why to do it, and why it works, let’s take a look at 7 tips for upselling the right way. 

1. ALWAYS Add Value 

If there’s only one thing you should take away from this article it’s that an upsell should always add value to your customer. 

Offering value is the key to getting your customers to sign on to buying more from you. 

And one way to make sure your customers are getting value from the products you’re offering is by choosing upsells that are relevant. This is especially important with cross-selling.

If you’re offering a course on marketing, for instance, a good cross-sell would be a collection of case studies outlining the best conversion optimization techniques like our Proven Sales Conversion Pack

The more relevant you can make your upsell or cross-sell offer, the more likely your customers will be to buy. 

2. NEVER Make It Meaningless

In the same vein as the last tip, don’t ever throw in products just for the sake of including an upsell. 

Upselling is first and foremost about increasing the value of a customer. 

But trying to get your customers to add on something that’s completely irrelevant to who they are and what they’re trying to do is a quick way to lose trust. Plus, it makes your brand seem a little scummy. 

So not only will your upsell probably not perform that great, but it’ll also knock your reputation down a peg too. And that can spell out trouble for keeping your customers loyal. 

3. ALWAYS Add Upsells During Checkout

Adding in upsells and cross-sells during the checkout process is a great way to increase AOV.

And you see this tactic everywhere where money is being exchanged. At the supermarket, on Amazon, at the gas station. That’s what all those mouthwatering candy bars are doing there in the checkout line!

They’re there because putting impulse buys at the end of a shopping experience gets people to buy. Throwing in a few relevant and useful add-ons to your checkout page is a quick and easy way to up the average order value of your customers. 

However, you don’t want to abandon the upsell best practice of making your offers relevant

Even if your offer is an impulse buy, you don’t want to do anything to poison the customer trust you’ve worked so hard to build. 

4. NEVER Make Their Prices Disproportionate

You never want to make the price difference between the original product and the upsell too high. 

Because if you do, no one is going to end up adding it on to their order. 

That’s because they’re already prepared to spend a certain amount once they’ve reached the checkout line. And if the price of the add ons you include is as much as the original product, it’s going to immediately seem like a bad offer. 

Instead, aim for a smaller price difference. Some experts say 25% of the original price is the sweet spot. Others claim 40%

In the end, though, the best thing you can do is A/B test what’s right for your business and your products. 

5. ALWAYS Follow Up With Emails (Seriously… ALWAYS)

Never miss a chance to follow up with past customers via email. 

Building and maintaining an email list is without a doubt one of the best ROIs in the industry. In fact, some estimates but the return on investment as high as 3,800% according to Hubspot.

That’s because email is a direct avenue of speaking to your customers. 

  • You can nurture the relationship by sending them content they’ll get value out of. 
  • You can clue them in to special promotions you’re running right now. 
  • You can show them the value of upgrading their current plan. 
  • And you can increase their CLV by cross-selling other products that they’re sure to enjoy. 

Just be sure to make things relevant and useful by personalizing each email. Otherwise, you may be doing more harm to your relationship than good. 

6. NEVER Resort to Sneaky Tactics

We’ve all seen those upsell pages that pull out all the superficial stops to get you to buy. 

The bright colors, the flashing lights, the bolded and uppercase fonts. They’re annoying, right? 

They reek of desperation. And they certainly don’t change your mind and get you to buy in most cases. 

But what’s even worse than that is using sneaky tactics to get your customers to add an upsell. 

Tactics like making it harder to decline your offer with hidden “No Thanks” buttons. Or wording the copy in such a confusing way that visitors click to opt out only to find they’ve actually been signed up for the add on. 

Do not do this. Doing so can instantly devastate the trust you’ve built with your audience this far. 

And even if they do end up signing on to purchase the upsell, they likely won’t be coming back to buy anything from you again. 

7. ALWAYS Try to Bundle Your Upsells When You Can

Bundling is a great tactic used by marketers in nearly every industry. It’s when the specific features and details of your product or service are included in one over-arching price rather than separated out. 

AutoGrow, for example, includes Copywriting, Quality Assurance, Graphic Design, Strategy Sessions, and Ad Management in all of our monthly packages of our Done-For-You sales funnel service without calling out the individual costs of each. 

In addition to this saving us a heck of a lot of time pricing each (after all, each is 100% integral to delivering a polished and high-converting end product), it also makes it easier to get buy-in from clients. 

Why? 

Because bundling actually triggers fewer pain points than seeing the costs of each feature. Instead of 5 price tags, clients only see 1. And for many, that’s a much easier pill to swallow.

Conclusion

Upselling is one of the best ways to increase the AOV and CLV of your audience. And at the same time, incorporating upselling/cross-selling into your business is actually more cost-effective than spending money on bringing in new customers. 

If your interest is piqued and you’re looking to start upselling (and honestly, why wouldn’t you be), there are 7 things in particular you can do to make it more successful…

  • ALWAYS Add Value
  • NEVER Make It Meaningless
  • ALWAYS Add Upsells During Checkout
  • NEVER Make Their Prices Disproportionate
  • ALWAYS Follow Up With Emails (Seriously… ALWAYS)
  • NEVER Resort To Sneaky Tactics
  • ALWAYS Try To Bundle Your Upsells When You Can

And if you do all of those, you’re sure to see a hefty bump in your bottom line thanks to your upselling efforts. 

How has upselling improved your business? What techniques, in particular, have you used that have gotten you results? 

Let us know in the comments below. 

And as always…

Keep funnelin’, stay focused,

Alex T.

Read more

7 Techniques for Mastering the Upsell & Boosting Customer Buy-In

Source: https://www.autogrow.co/7-techniques-for-upselling/

Have you ever played Starcraft? And what about Civilization? Or any other computer strategy game for that matter? 

In these kinds of games, you basically control the growth and evolution of a society. 

In order to grow, you need to mine and collect resources. Lumber, ore, food, stones—you know, the building blocks of any great civilization. 

And like so many other games, the end goal is usually to dominate the other societies on the map. 

Now, a lot of people make the mistake of focusing all their efforts on boosting military power first thing. But the truth is, upgrading your ability to mine resources better is the key to success. Because when you focus on that, you can get more lumber out of a tree. More stone out of a quarry. And more ore out of a mine. 

You’re getting more value out of the same resource

And that lets you grow, advance, and thrive faster than the other societies you’re competing with. 

Upselling is like upgrading your business’ ability to mine value from your customers. It lets you earn higher revenue per client. And that means you don’t have to spend nearly as much time on finding new clients… when you do it right

In this article you will learn how to master the art of upselling, why they work, and how they help you get more value from fewer customers.

So let’s start skyrocketing your customer value with upselling right now!

What is an Upsell?

Before getting into how upselling can help you boost your business, let’s make sure we understand what an upsell is. 

Here’s a quick definition we go by here at AutoGrow: 

An upsell is a technique where you entice a customer to buy more. You can do this by providing upgrades, expensive items, or other add-ons to their purchase to increase the dollar amount of the entire purchase.

Simply put, an upsell is just a way to increase the value of each customer. It accomplishes that goal by getting a customer to buy other products or upgrade to higher value ones that you offer. 

There are two main ways of incorporating upselling into your business. 

1. Increase the Average Order Value (AOV) by getting clients to buy other products or upgrading before checking out. 

2. Increase the Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) by getting clients to buy other products or upgrading after checking out (this is where a solid email nurturing campaign comes in).

Why Do I Need to Start Upselling? 

Simple… 

It makes you money. Why else do you do anything in a business? 

Upselling increases the value of a customer. Whether it’s by boosting their initial purchase value or by increasing the lifetime value, the end result is still the same: your customers will be worth more. 

But what makes upselling different is the fact that it’s often an especially simple and cost-effective way of increasing the value of a customer. 

For example, we’ve all heard the old saying that it’s more costly to get new customers than to retain old ones. But do you know just how huge the difference is? 

Some estimates put it at being 5X more expensive to find new customers compared to selling to older ones. 

In fact, boosting customer retention rates by just 5% has been shown to lead to profit increases of 25% or more! That’s because returning customers have a higher CLV. They’re easier to sell to, often have a higher AOV when they do buy from you, and they are a great source for referrals too. 

Okay, so increasing retention is great for business. But what a lot of businesses don’t take into account is that boosting monetization of current customers also comes with a huge ROI boost

We covered this in another post about upselling but it’s worth repeating here. 

In a study of 512 different companies, Price Intelligently, a pricing strategy company, found that increasing monetization of current customers is the fastest route to boosting profits. 

As you can see from the graph below, improving the AOV (monetization) of customers by just 1% can lead to a 12.7% increase in profits

Retention came in second with a 6.71% profit boost per 1% improvement and acquisition was dead last with just a 3.32% increase. 

Source: Price Intelligently

The main takeaway here is clear: increasing the AOV and CLV of customers is more important than bringing in new ones. 

And upselling is the best and easiest way to do both.

Upselling vs. Cross-Selling

There’s usually quite a bit of confusion surrounding this question. And in fact, a lot of the time people just use the two terms interchangeably. I’m guilty of it myself. 

Now, in most cases using the wrong term here won’t be the difference between life or death. 

But when you get down to the nitty-gritty of it all, there are some distinct differences between the two. So let’s take a look at just what those differences are. 

  • Upselling: This is technically when a business or service offers an upgrade to a product that a customer has picked out. Take AutoGrow for example. Our instant Done-For-You funnel marketing team’s Ultimate Package is our most popular. But we also know some clients will get more value out of the Supreme Package. So we send out an upsell email describing the benefits of switching to the Supreme Package so our clients understand if it’s a good fit for their business. That’s an upsell
  • Cross-Selling: This is when you offer a different product or service to a customer after they’ve already chosen what they’re buying from you. Amazon does a great job at this. There’s an entire section of every product page that shows you what other products are frequently bought together with the one you’re looking at. If I look at a baseball glove, for example, it also shows me baseballs and glove oil, right on the same page! There are even a few buttons right there so you can add them to your cart with just one click. That’s cross-selling. 

There are plenty of other examples of upsells and cross-sells out there today, especially as e-commerce becomes the main way we shop today. 

And honestly, distinguishing between the two isn’t as important as understanding what both accomplish, which is increasing the value of a customer. 

3 Reasons Why Upselling/Cross-Selling Works

Upselling and cross-selling are two of the best ways to boost monetization and retention of customers. And as we’ve seen, focusing on these two areas in particular can increase profitability by 3-4X more than concentrating on customer acquisition. 

But why do these tactics work? Why do people respond to them? And what is it about these techniques that make them irresistible when done right? 

There are 3 reasons here…

  • Emotional Excitement: First and foremost, there’s the thrill of buying! Okay, so emotions may not be running too high when you’re purchasing a new loofa or a pack of undershirts. But there are two things in particular that bring out our emotional side when buying: the promise of a better you (smarter, sexier, funnier, happier, whatever!) and cashing in on an exceptional deal (high value for low cost). Upselling taps into those emotions from the original product and makes them even stronger. They’re taking what makes you feel good about buying and giving it a boost along the way. 
  • Already Spending Money: The hardest part about spending money is… well, first deciding to spend money. There’s the guilt, the uncertainty, the skepticism—it all adds up to you asking yourself, “Is this really worth it?” But when you’ve already barrelled past those obstacles once, it makes it so much easier to keep on doing it. Once you’ve actually decided to spend money on a purchase, you’ve broken down the floodgates. And making an additional purchase (as long as it has value) is going to be easier than deciding to make the first. 
  • Trust Is Built: Finally, once you’ve built up trust with a customer, it’s far easier to sell to them again and again. One of the most commonly pointed to stats here is from Marketing Metrics. It says, “The probability of selling to a new prospect is 5%-20%. The probability of selling to an existing customer is 60-70%.” That’s because you’ve already shown past customers that you deliver value. And once you’ve done that, you become a trusted source of quality products or services. All that’s left now is maintaining that trust.

7 Things to ALWAYS (and NEVER) Do When Upselling

So, now that we know what upselling is, why to do it, and why it works, let’s take a look at 7 tips for upselling the right way. 

1. ALWAYS Add Value 

If there’s only one thing you should take away from this article it’s that an upsell should always add value to your customer. 

Offering value is the key to getting your customers to sign on to buying more from you. 

And one way to make sure your customers are getting value from the products you’re offering is by choosing upsells that are relevant. This is especially important with cross-selling.

If you’re offering a course on marketing, for instance, a good cross-sell would be a collection of case studies outlining the best conversion optimization techniques like our Proven Sales Conversion Pack

The more relevant you can make your upsell or cross-sell offer, the more likely your customers will be to buy. 

2. NEVER Make It Meaningless

In the same vein as the last tip, don’t ever throw in products just for the sake of including an upsell. 

Upselling is first and foremost about increasing the value of a customer. 

But trying to get your customers to add on something that’s completely irrelevant to who they are and what they’re trying to do is a quick way to lose trust. Plus, it makes your brand seem a little scummy. 

So not only will your upsell probably not perform that great, but it’ll also knock your reputation down a peg too. And that can spell out trouble for keeping your customers loyal. 

3. ALWAYS Add Upsells During Checkout

Adding in upsells and cross-sells during the checkout process is a great way to increase AOV.

And you see this tactic everywhere where money is being exchanged. At the supermarket, on Amazon, at the gas station. That’s what all those mouthwatering candy bars are doing there in the checkout line!

They’re there because putting impulse buys at the end of a shopping experience gets people to buy. Throwing in a few relevant and useful add-ons to your checkout page is a quick and easy way to up the average order value of your customers. 

However, you don’t want to abandon the upsell best practice of making your offers relevant

Even if your offer is an impulse buy, you don’t want to do anything to poison the customer trust you’ve worked so hard to build. 

4. NEVER Make Their Prices Disproportionate

You never want to make the price difference between the original product and the upsell too high. 

Because if you do, no one is going to end up adding it on to their order. 

That’s because they’re already prepared to spend a certain amount once they’ve reached the checkout line. And if the price of the add ons you include is as much as the original product, it’s going to immediately seem like a bad offer. 

Instead, aim for a smaller price difference. Some experts say 25% of the original price is the sweet spot. Others claim 40%

In the end, though, the best thing you can do is A/B test what’s right for your business and your products. 

5. ALWAYS Follow Up With Emails (Seriously… ALWAYS)

Never miss a chance to follow up with past customers via email. 

Building and maintaining an email list is without a doubt one of the best ROIs in the industry. In fact, some estimates but the return on investment as high as 3,800% according to Hubspot.

That’s because email is a direct avenue of speaking to your customers. 

  • You can nurture the relationship by sending them content they’ll get value out of. 
  • You can clue them in to special promotions you’re running right now. 
  • You can show them the value of upgrading their current plan. 
  • And you can increase their CLV by cross-selling other products that they’re sure to enjoy. 

Just be sure to make things relevant and useful by personalizing each email. Otherwise, you may be doing more harm to your relationship than good. 

6. NEVER Resort to Sneaky Tactics

We’ve all seen those upsell pages that pull out all the superficial stops to get you to buy. 

The bright colors, the flashing lights, the bolded and uppercase fonts. They’re annoying, right? 

They reek of desperation. And they certainly don’t change your mind and get you to buy in most cases. 

But what’s even worse than that is using sneaky tactics to get your customers to add an upsell. 

Tactics like making it harder to decline your offer with hidden “No Thanks” buttons. Or wording the copy in such a confusing way that visitors click to opt out only to find they’ve actually been signed up for the add on. 

Do not do this. Doing so can instantly devastate the trust you’ve built with your audience this far. 

And even if they do end up signing on to purchase the upsell, they likely won’t be coming back to buy anything from you again. 

7. ALWAYS Try to Bundle Your Upsells When You Can

Bundling is a great tactic used by marketers in nearly every industry. It’s when the specific features and details of your product or service are included in one over-arching price rather than separated out. 

AutoGrow, for example, includes Copywriting, Quality Assurance, Graphic Design, Strategy Sessions, and Ad Management in all of our monthly packages of our Done-For-You sales funnel service without calling out the individual costs of each. 

In addition to this saving us a heck of a lot of time pricing each (after all, each is 100% integral to delivering a polished and high-converting end product), it also makes it easier to get buy-in from clients. 

Why? 

Because bundling actually triggers fewer pain points than seeing the costs of each feature. Instead of 5 price tags, clients only see 1. And for many, that’s a much easier pill to swallow.

Conclusion

Upselling is one of the best ways to increase the AOV and CLV of your audience. And at the same time, incorporating upselling/cross-selling into your business is actually more cost-effective than spending money on bringing in new customers. 

If your interest is piqued and you’re looking to start upselling (and honestly, why wouldn’t you be), there are 7 things in particular you can do to make it more successful…

  • ALWAYS Add Value
  • NEVER Make It Meaningless
  • ALWAYS Add Upsells During Checkout
  • NEVER Make Their Prices Disproportionate
  • ALWAYS Follow Up With Emails (Seriously… ALWAYS)
  • NEVER Resort To Sneaky Tactics
  • ALWAYS Try To Bundle Your Upsells When You Can

And if you do all of those, you’re sure to see a hefty bump in your bottom line thanks to your upselling efforts. 

How has upselling improved your business? What techniques, in particular, have you used that have gotten you results? 

Let us know in the comments below. 

And as always…

Keep funnelin’, stay focused,

Alex T.

Read more

7 Techniques for Mastering the Upsell & Boosting Customer Buy-In

Source: https://www.autogrow.co/7-techniques-for-upselling/

Have you ever played Starcraft? And what about Civilization? Or any other computer strategy game for that matter? 

In these kinds of games, you basically control the growth and evolution of a society. 

In order to grow, you need to mine and collect resources. Lumber, ore, food, stones—you know, the building blocks of any great civilization. 

And like so many other games, the end goal is usually to dominate the other societies on the map. 

Now, a lot of people make the mistake of focusing all their efforts on boosting military power first thing. But the truth is, upgrading your ability to mine resources better is the key to success. Because when you focus on that, you can get more lumber out of a tree. More stone out of a quarry. And more ore out of a mine. 

You’re getting more value out of the same resource

And that lets you grow, advance, and thrive faster than the other societies you’re competing with. 

Upselling is like upgrading your business’ ability to mine value from your customers. It lets you earn higher revenue per client. And that means you don’t have to spend nearly as much time on finding new clients… when you do it right

In this article you will learn how to master the art of upselling, why they work, and how they help you get more value from fewer customers.

So let’s start skyrocketing your customer value with upselling right now!

What is an Upsell?

Before getting into how upselling can help you boost your business, let’s make sure we understand what an upsell is. 

Here’s a quick definition we go by here at AutoGrow: 

An upsell is a technique where you entice a customer to buy more. You can do this by providing upgrades, expensive items, or other add-ons to their purchase to increase the dollar amount of the entire purchase.

Simply put, an upsell is just a way to increase the value of each customer. It accomplishes that goal by getting a customer to buy other products or upgrade to higher value ones that you offer. 

There are two main ways of incorporating upselling into your business. 

1. Increase the Average Order Value (AOV) by getting clients to buy other products or upgrading before checking out. 

2. Increase the Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) by getting clients to buy other products or upgrading after checking out (this is where a solid email nurturing campaign comes in).

Why Do I Need to Start Upselling? 

Simple… 

It makes you money. Why else do you do anything in a business? 

Upselling increases the value of a customer. Whether it’s by boosting their initial purchase value or by increasing the lifetime value, the end result is still the same: your customers will be worth more. 

But what makes upselling different is the fact that it’s often an especially simple and cost-effective way of increasing the value of a customer. 

For example, we’ve all heard the old saying that it’s more costly to get new customers than to retain old ones. But do you know just how huge the difference is? 

Some estimates put it at being 5X more expensive to find new customers compared to selling to older ones. 

In fact, boosting customer retention rates by just 5% has been shown to lead to profit increases of 25% or more! That’s because returning customers have a higher CLV. They’re easier to sell to, often have a higher AOV when they do buy from you, and they are a great source for referrals too. 

Okay, so increasing retention is great for business. But what a lot of businesses don’t take into account is that boosting monetization of current customers also comes with a huge ROI boost

We covered this in another post about upselling but it’s worth repeating here. 

In a study of 512 different companies, Price Intelligently, a pricing strategy company, found that increasing monetization of current customers is the fastest route to boosting profits. 

As you can see from the graph below, improving the AOV (monetization) of customers by just 1% can lead to a 12.7% increase in profits

Retention came in second with a 6.71% profit boost per 1% improvement and acquisition was dead last with just a 3.32% increase. 

Source: Price Intelligently

The main takeaway here is clear: increasing the AOV and CLV of customers is more important than bringing in new ones. 

And upselling is the best and easiest way to do both.

Upselling vs. Cross-Selling

There’s usually quite a bit of confusion surrounding this question. And in fact, a lot of the time people just use the two terms interchangeably. I’m guilty of it myself. 

Now, in most cases using the wrong term here won’t be the difference between life or death. 

But when you get down to the nitty-gritty of it all, there are some distinct differences between the two. So let’s take a look at just what those differences are. 

  • Upselling: This is technically when a business or service offers an upgrade to a product that a customer has picked out. Take AutoGrow for example. Our instant Done-For-You funnel marketing team’s Ultimate Package is our most popular. But we also know some clients will get more value out of the Supreme Package. So we send out an upsell email describing the benefits of switching to the Supreme Package so our clients understand if it’s a good fit for their business. That’s an upsell
  • Cross-Selling: This is when you offer a different product or service to a customer after they’ve already chosen what they’re buying from you. Amazon does a great job at this. There’s an entire section of every product page that shows you what other products are frequently bought together with the one you’re looking at. If I look at a baseball glove, for example, it also shows me baseballs and glove oil, right on the same page! There are even a few buttons right there so you can add them to your cart with just one click. That’s cross-selling. 

There are plenty of other examples of upsells and cross-sells out there today, especially as e-commerce becomes the main way we shop today. 

And honestly, distinguishing between the two isn’t as important as understanding what both accomplish, which is increasing the value of a customer. 

3 Reasons Why Upselling/Cross-Selling Works

Upselling and cross-selling are two of the best ways to boost monetization and retention of customers. And as we’ve seen, focusing on these two areas in particular can increase profitability by 3-4X more than concentrating on customer acquisition. 

But why do these tactics work? Why do people respond to them? And what is it about these techniques that make them irresistible when done right? 

There are 3 reasons here…

  • Emotional Excitement: First and foremost, there’s the thrill of buying! Okay, so emotions may not be running too high when you’re purchasing a new loofa or a pack of undershirts. But there are two things in particular that bring out our emotional side when buying: the promise of a better you (smarter, sexier, funnier, happier, whatever!) and cashing in on an exceptional deal (high value for low cost). Upselling taps into those emotions from the original product and makes them even stronger. They’re taking what makes you feel good about buying and giving it a boost along the way. 
  • Already Spending Money: The hardest part about spending money is… well, first deciding to spend money. There’s the guilt, the uncertainty, the skepticism—it all adds up to you asking yourself, “Is this really worth it?” But when you’ve already barrelled past those obstacles once, it makes it so much easier to keep on doing it. Once you’ve actually decided to spend money on a purchase, you’ve broken down the floodgates. And making an additional purchase (as long as it has value) is going to be easier than deciding to make the first. 
  • Trust Is Built: Finally, once you’ve built up trust with a customer, it’s far easier to sell to them again and again. One of the most commonly pointed to stats here is from Marketing Metrics. It says, “The probability of selling to a new prospect is 5%-20%. The probability of selling to an existing customer is 60-70%.” That’s because you’ve already shown past customers that you deliver value. And once you’ve done that, you become a trusted source of quality products or services. All that’s left now is maintaining that trust.

7 Things to ALWAYS (and NEVER) Do When Upselling

So, now that we know what upselling is, why to do it, and why it works, let’s take a look at 7 tips for upselling the right way. 

1. ALWAYS Add Value 

If there’s only one thing you should take away from this article it’s that an upsell should always add value to your customer. 

Offering value is the key to getting your customers to sign on to buying more from you. 

And one way to make sure your customers are getting value from the products you’re offering is by choosing upsells that are relevant. This is especially important with cross-selling.

If you’re offering a course on marketing, for instance, a good cross-sell would be a collection of case studies outlining the best conversion optimization techniques like our Proven Sales Conversion Pack

The more relevant you can make your upsell or cross-sell offer, the more likely your customers will be to buy. 

2. NEVER Make It Meaningless

In the same vein as the last tip, don’t ever throw in products just for the sake of including an upsell. 

Upselling is first and foremost about increasing the value of a customer. 

But trying to get your customers to add on something that’s completely irrelevant to who they are and what they’re trying to do is a quick way to lose trust. Plus, it makes your brand seem a little scummy. 

So not only will your upsell probably not perform that great, but it’ll also knock your reputation down a peg too. And that can spell out trouble for keeping your customers loyal. 

3. ALWAYS Add Upsells During Checkout

Adding in upsells and cross-sells during the checkout process is a great way to increase AOV.

And you see this tactic everywhere where money is being exchanged. At the supermarket, on Amazon, at the gas station. That’s what all those mouthwatering candy bars are doing there in the checkout line!

They’re there because putting impulse buys at the end of a shopping experience gets people to buy. Throwing in a few relevant and useful add-ons to your checkout page is a quick and easy way to up the average order value of your customers. 

However, you don’t want to abandon the upsell best practice of making your offers relevant

Even if your offer is an impulse buy, you don’t want to do anything to poison the customer trust you’ve worked so hard to build. 

4. NEVER Make Their Prices Disproportionate

You never want to make the price difference between the original product and the upsell too high. 

Because if you do, no one is going to end up adding it on to their order. 

That’s because they’re already prepared to spend a certain amount once they’ve reached the checkout line. And if the price of the add ons you include is as much as the original product, it’s going to immediately seem like a bad offer. 

Instead, aim for a smaller price difference. Some experts say 25% of the original price is the sweet spot. Others claim 40%

In the end, though, the best thing you can do is A/B test what’s right for your business and your products. 

5. ALWAYS Follow Up With Emails (Seriously… ALWAYS)

Never miss a chance to follow up with past customers via email. 

Building and maintaining an email list is without a doubt one of the best ROIs in the industry. In fact, some estimates but the return on investment as high as 3,800% according to Hubspot.

That’s because email is a direct avenue of speaking to your customers. 

  • You can nurture the relationship by sending them content they’ll get value out of. 
  • You can clue them in to special promotions you’re running right now. 
  • You can show them the value of upgrading their current plan. 
  • And you can increase their CLV by cross-selling other products that they’re sure to enjoy. 

Just be sure to make things relevant and useful by personalizing each email. Otherwise, you may be doing more harm to your relationship than good. 

6. NEVER Resort to Sneaky Tactics

We’ve all seen those upsell pages that pull out all the superficial stops to get you to buy. 

The bright colors, the flashing lights, the bolded and uppercase fonts. They’re annoying, right? 

They reek of desperation. And they certainly don’t change your mind and get you to buy in most cases. 

But what’s even worse than that is using sneaky tactics to get your customers to add an upsell. 

Tactics like making it harder to decline your offer with hidden “No Thanks” buttons. Or wording the copy in such a confusing way that visitors click to opt out only to find they’ve actually been signed up for the add on. 

Do not do this. Doing so can instantly devastate the trust you’ve built with your audience this far. 

And even if they do end up signing on to purchase the upsell, they likely won’t be coming back to buy anything from you again. 

7. ALWAYS Try to Bundle Your Upsells When You Can

Bundling is a great tactic used by marketers in nearly every industry. It’s when the specific features and details of your product or service are included in one over-arching price rather than separated out. 

AutoGrow, for example, includes Copywriting, Quality Assurance, Graphic Design, Strategy Sessions, and Ad Management in all of our monthly packages of our Done-For-You sales funnel service without calling out the individual costs of each. 

In addition to this saving us a heck of a lot of time pricing each (after all, each is 100% integral to delivering a polished and high-converting end product), it also makes it easier to get buy-in from clients. 

Why? 

Because bundling actually triggers fewer pain points than seeing the costs of each feature. Instead of 5 price tags, clients only see 1. And for many, that’s a much easier pill to swallow.

Conclusion

Upselling is one of the best ways to increase the AOV and CLV of your audience. And at the same time, incorporating upselling/cross-selling into your business is actually more cost-effective than spending money on bringing in new customers. 

If your interest is piqued and you’re looking to start upselling (and honestly, why wouldn’t you be), there are 7 things in particular you can do to make it more successful…

  • ALWAYS Add Value
  • NEVER Make It Meaningless
  • ALWAYS Add Upsells During Checkout
  • NEVER Make Their Prices Disproportionate
  • ALWAYS Follow Up With Emails (Seriously… ALWAYS)
  • NEVER Resort To Sneaky Tactics
  • ALWAYS Try To Bundle Your Upsells When You Can

And if you do all of those, you’re sure to see a hefty bump in your bottom line thanks to your upselling efforts. 

How has upselling improved your business? What techniques, in particular, have you used that have gotten you results? 

Let us know in the comments below. 

And as always…

Keep funnelin’, stay focused,

Alex T.

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NEWS // New Representation: Tea & Water Pictures

Source: http://focus52.blogspot.com/2018/06/news-new-representation-tea-water.html

I’m pleased to announce that I am now represented by Tea & Water Pictures in New York, London and Beijing. They are an exciting agency that have a some great production experience and a team with really diverse but complimentary backgrounds, so I’m excited to see what we can achieve together over the next few years!

They’ve also done a little interview with me which, if you’re interested, you can read here 

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9 Email Marketing Subject Lines Live From My Email Inbox — And How To Fix Them

Source: https://www.square2marketing.com/blog/9-email-marketing-subject-lines-live-from-my-email-inbox-and-how-to-fix-them

Email Marketing Won’t Work If Your Subject Lines Are Weak

Email marketing is key to connecting with clients and prospects. Email marketing is also important to continuing the conversation with people when they leave your website. In fact, we could look at the entire buyer journey and find a use case for email marketing at almost every stage.

But if you send emails with weak subject lines, you’re wasting your time, money and energy.

Email marketing has only one goal to get your contact to click on a link and revisit your company. It could be content, your website or your sales team. If you don’t get the recipient to open the email, they’ll never see the link. If they never see the link, you’re sunk.

This makes the subject line the most important part of the email marketing strategy.

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What Netflix Can Teach Us About Effective Customer Data Platform Use

Source: https://postfunnel.com/what-netflix-can-teach-us-about-effective-customer-data-platform-use/

Netflix is not just a successful streaming platform or producer of original video content — in many ways, it behaves like a customer data platform (CDP). Its algorithms collect massive volumes of data on what subscribers watch, enjoy, and search for before spitting out recommendations for other shows they might like. These insights are even used to automate and personalize the UI experience, right down to changing content thumbnails and cover art.

We may not think about Netflix’s algorithms and user profiles often, but they’re a major factor in the company’s success. The streaming service calls its data platform the “core foundation in driving all of our product decisions that directly impact our customer experience,” and constantly seeks new ways to innovate and effectively use this data. It’s working — the company has a user retention rate of 93%, an almost unbelievable figure among marketers. Data capabilities are helping Netflix sustain its market advantage, even as competitors like Disney+ and Amazon Prime rise to challenge it.

For an intro to CDPs and how they work, go here and check out our other articles on CDPs:
Navigate the Fluff: A Best Practices Guide for CDPs and Customer Retention
Asking the Experts: Is It the Age of CDPs?
Why CDPs Fail: A Tale of Three Unfulfilled Expectations

CDP eBook
For service providers and marketers outside the streaming industry, Netflix has a great deal to teach us. What are the fundamentals of Netflix’s CDP, and what can brands learn from them?

Focus on specific data goals

While Netflix knows a great deal about our viewing habits, those insights are based on a surprisingly narrow data range. The platform’s core data process is to gather information exclusively from within the service. It doesn’t collect data from outside the platform, nor does it track the habits of non-subscribers. Netflix focuses on the ways specific users utilize the platform and extrapolates trends from there.

In other words, Netflix is a prime example of the ways small, local data can lead to strong business success. Instead of struggling to obtain every detail about its subscribers, the platform tries to understand everything about how they use it — which is ultimately the most valuable information. Netflix has followed this core business strategy since it first launched, serving as an excellent lesson for marketers in other spaces.

Watch precisely how users engage with your platform

While Netflix’s data range is relatively narrow, it squeezes every ounce of information it possibly can from what it has. The platform is constantly monitoring and collating every action a user takes. We’re talking everything that could matter, from the videos you watched to the ways you watched them: completion rate, time of day, when you paused, fast-forwarded and rewound, when you started, and when you stopped halfway through then resumed. Netflix takes this information both in aggregate and individually to build a portrait of how specific users consume content. With these insights at hand, the algorithm compares, contrasts, and makes suggestions.

Personalize product recommendations with expertly-assigned content tags

When marketers consider personalization, they usually build campaigns based on their biggest market segments and personalize within those groups. Netflix, however, focuses on the “market of one” with a constant stream of unique personalization elements. Its CDP is trained to identify core audiences for new products based on a highly detailed tagging system that goes beyond genre to include dates, actors, and other traits within the content. This means Netflix can generate data-backed recommendations that will be a near-perfect fit in terms of shared product traits. It works, too: approximately 75% of Netflix’s watch numbers come from their recommendations algorithm.

These tags aren’t created by the algorithm itself, however. There are hundreds of tags within Netflix’s system, painstakingly applied by content experts. Those tags are processed within the recommendation algorithm, which measures any similarities and provides recommendations to users. Netflix’s CDP can even be used to project which audiences will enjoy greenlit original content — Orange Is the New Black was expected to be a smash hit among Weeds fans, for example. But that insight doesn’t happen without a manual helping hand, because the CDP only knows how products are used — not what the product is.

Use CDP features to save your marketing budget

When Netflix was advertising House of Cards to its audience, it had enough customer information to create ten different versions of the trailer for various audience segments. While this may seem excessive, it actually optimized Netflix’s marketing budget. Instead of trying to mass-produce trailers that don’t account for market segments, Netflix saved money by delivering ad content to the most receptive audience. Thanks to this highly efficient data use, the company now considers marketing a multiplier on content spend.

In many ways, this summarizes the power of Netflix’s CDP: while a great deal of work is required on the backend, the end result brings increased performance and efficiency, while staying well within budget. For marketers, that means you don’t have to look far to enhance the power of your CDP. If Netflix can do it, so can you.

The post What Netflix Can Teach Us About Effective Customer Data Platform Use appeared first on Post Funnel.

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A Thank-You Note…To Clients, Team Members And Partners

Source: https://www.square2marketing.com/blog/a-thank-you-note…to-clients-team-members-and-partners

I recently had the pleasure of watching “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” the movie based on the true story of the friendship between Fred Rogers and journalist Tom Junod.

What struck me the most was Mr. Rogers and the way he thoughtfully navigated the world, specifically his very attentive interactions with the people he met.

He generally seemed thankful for everyone he met and every interaction.

At this time of year, I like to take a beat and be thankful.

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Search Engine Optimization -A Marketer’s Guide to Being Found

Source: https://postfunnel.com/search-engine-optimization-the-marketers-guide-for-2020/

The best marketing techniques often don’t require expensive ad campaigns, but rather optimal use of resources you already have. Google search engine results are a prime example: while only 10% of all web traffic comes from paid search ads, over 50% comes from organic, non-promotional searches. In other words, effectively-designed web pages represent a low-cost, high-return marketing strategy — which is why search engine optimization (SEO) is crucial in 2020.

With 5.5 billion web searches processed every day — roughly 63,000 per second on average — search engines are an opportunity marketers can’t ignore. By optimizing your sites to rank for these searches, they can become evergreen sources of value that generate high volumes of organic traffic. The challenge lies in understanding what keywords users are searching for and how Google prioritizes search engine results.

As part of PostFunnel’s Nuts and Bolts series, we’ll delve into the world of modern Martech to shed some light on the tools and best practices being used by you — our fellow marketers — in your day-to-day strategies. Every month, our experts will sink their teeth into another aspect of this fascinating field, hopefully inspiring you to elevate your business through smarter marketing.

What is search engine optimization?

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of optimizing web pages to rank prominently on search engine results pages and, as a result, generate organic traffic. It covers a broad range of technical and syntactical practices built for the search algorithms that analyze web pages and evaluate their relevance to given search keywords. The vast majority of SEO practices are built around Google’s search algorithm, which accounts for 94% of global search traffic.

Google’s search engine is powered by a bot network that rank websites using the following process:

  1. Google’s bots crawl the web and collect data on websites
  2. Machine learning algorithms extract keywords appropriate for individual pages
  3. Google ranks individual pages and web domains for keyword expertise, domain name ownership, and other factors

For marketers, SEO is primarily used to create evergreen web pages purposefully-designed to rank for industry keywords. Most evergreen pages represent high-funnel marketing content that generates brand interest while guiding prospects to lower-funnel content through calls-to-action. If evergreen content is well-optimized and periodically maintained, it will perpetually generate organic web traffic and pay exponential dividends.

What are keywords?

Keywords are the phrases, topics, and terms that users enter into a search engine in order to learn more about a topic, access specific information, or navigate to a particular part of the internet. From the perspective of a search engine algorithm, each web page and domain has a set of primary keywords that summarize its content. A Postfunnel article, for example, might feature phrases like “retention marketing” or “customer-centric” as primary keywords. By understanding what keywords you’d like a page to rank for, marketers can optimize their content to appear in the search results of prospective customers.

To obtain these benefits, however, marketers need to ensure their website earns a high search ranking for a keyword. In any given search, 70% of clicks will go towards the top five results. Marketers can avoid this problem by optimizing their page for more specific keywords that attract the attention of relevant customers. This detail makes initial keyword research one of the most critical SEO skills for modern marketers.

Any text represented in your content should feature the keyword with enough frequency to ensure it is relevant. Marketers should be careful to avoid overt keyword repetition since Google’s algorithm is programmed to lower the ranking of these pages. Ideally, a keyword should appear two to three times in a 1000-word blog post.

What is metadata, and how does it relate to SEO?

For all its complexity, SEO is a relatively straightforward process when it comes to helping determine which web pages are relevant to a particular search query. In addition to optimizing the actual content of a page, effective SEO also involves leveraging a page’s metadata to encourage search engine algorithms to rank pages favorably.

Within the context of web design, metadata refers to information within the non-visible parts of HTML. While this information isn’t shown directly to readers, it is analyzed alongside page copy by Google’s algorithm and should feature your primary keywords.

When applying SEO techniques to branded websites, there are several metadata elements marketers should consider:

  • Page titles: If your keyword doesn’t appear directly in the page title, why would a customer — let alone a bot — click on the search result? Why Google’s algorithms are flexible enough that a keyword variant is acceptable, title metadata tags should never be overlooked.
  • URLs: Marketers should always resist the instinct to let their blogging software automatically generate a URL. Go into the URL manually and create a human-readable phrase that includes your keyword whenever possible.
  • Meta descriptions: While meta descriptions don’t always appear directly on web pages, they are prominently featured in metadata and will be displayed in Google’s search results.
  • Image alt tags: To a search engine bot or algorithm, images are simple blocks of HTML code. By inserting your keyword into an image alt tag, you create another opportunity to enhance the relevance of your page.

What are backlinks?

When it comes to SEO, it’s not enough to construct an optimally-designed website. Marketers also need to ensure the site is considered an expert in any field their chosen keywords reference. Google primarily measures expertise through backlinks or inbound links, which occur when another website creates a URL reference to your domain or individual web page. If your web page has a high volume of backlinks shared across the web, Google will consider it a valuable reference for a keyword and adjust its ranking accordingly.

Over the years, marketers have tried to game SEO backlink practices in various ways including keyword stuffing and paid link building. Google’s algorithms no longer give credit based on these practices, which means marketers must put greater effort into creating valuable content that generates backlinks organically.

On top of incoming links, Google also tracks outbound links to third-party websites. These backlinks show that a web domain is referencing other expert sources and generally engaging with the broader online ecosystem. When creating any blog post or web article, optimal SEO practices usually require three outbound links for every 1000 words of content to have an impact on search ranking.

What is local SEO?

SEO techniques are not one-size-fits-all, and local SEO is unique. Web designers and marketers should always make a distinction between optimizing for generic keywords and optimizing for a specific purpose, such as conversions. Perhaps the most common examples of the latter are locally-optimized web pages that attract customers to a particular store location. These can include everything from searches for local businesses to searches for local branches of a major chain.

In these cases, the goal of local SEO is to optimize each page for the surrounding area using regional and geographical keywords, usually on top of generic keywords for a given industry. This additional step may seem unnecessary but is highly relevant — research suggests that local smartphone searches are more likely to generate sales than non-local searches for similar products or services.

So how can businesses enhance their web presence for local sales? In brief, here are the considerations to keep in mind:

  1. Include local audience insights in your web copy: Incorporate any details that relate to customers from any locations your brand serves. What does an ideal customer expect to see when arriving on a page, and what exactly are they looking for?
  2. Feature local details in metadata: When your metadata includes information about your customer’s location, it will enhance the relevancy of their search. Consider adding your city name or other local details in the page title, meta description, keyword tags, and other metadata as appropriate.
  3. Optimize pages for mobile users: Over half of all searches come from mobile devices, so businesses need to optimize their web pages accordingly. This includes making the page readable on the mobile web and including localized lander details — like street address — that will appear in proximity searches.

Local optimization guides like this one from Neil Patel elaborate on these points from a more technical perspective. But as long as marketers can find ways to incorporate local details onto a page, the more likely local customers will be able to find you.

How do you measure SEO performance?

For most marketers, SEO performance is something that can only be measured through observation. The exact calculations behind ranking improvements and reductions are decided internally by Google and other search engines. Thankfully, there are a few reliable ways to determine the effectiveness of your SEO efforts.

Google rankings

As with many questions, the most straightforward place to find an answer is Google! A quick search can help you determine whether a web domain or page has increased in rank. While you can never be sure which HTML element change increased the ranking, it can tell you how much it’s improved and how much farther you need to go.

Web traffic

Businesses generally don’t want to increase their Google rank for its own sake — they want the organic traffic that comes with it. By measuring web traffic before and after an SEO campaign, marketers can internally calculate their performance. Just don’t forget to distinguish traffic from organic searches and inbound links. While the two are related within Google’s algorithm, only the former is a result of SEO efforts.

Conversion rates

For an emerging website, dramatically increasing web traffic can be a genuine challenge. Your goal is to ensure that most visitors find exactly what they were searching for, thereby converting them into prospective customers. SEO can directly impact conversion rates if you optimize pages for targeted keywords that will engage your most valuable audience segments.

Third-party SEO analysis

While SEO analysis without Google’s data is mostly guesswork, some third-party organizations have made it their business to provide educated guesswork. SEO platforms and tools like Moz or Yoast offer a variety of free and premium tools that recommend improvements to web pages.

Search engine optimization is not the only marketing technique at a brand’s disposal, but it is undoubtedly one of the most powerful. SEO strategies are typically low-cost but generate a massive return in the form of perpetual organic traffic. If you can remember the myriad ways Google searches have informed you about interesting topics, you can quickly grasp the power SEO can offer your business. That’s an opportunity any marketer should be aware of in 2020.

Customer marketing challenges and opportunities

The post Search Engine Optimization -A Marketer’s Guide to Being Found appeared first on Post Funnel.

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